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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Yokuts and western Mono myths found in the catalog.

Yokuts and western Mono myths

A. H. Gayton

Yokuts and western Mono myths

by A. H. Gayton

  • 168 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by University of California Press in Berkeley, Los Angeles .
Written in English

    Places:
  • California.
    • Subjects:
    • Yokuts Indians -- Folklore.,
    • Mono Indians -- Folklore.,
    • Legends -- California.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby A. H. Gayton and Stanley S. Newman.
      GenreFolklore.
      SeriesAnthropological records,, 5:1
      ContributionsNewman, Stanley S. 1905- joint author.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE51 .A58 vol. 5, no. 1
      The Physical Object
      Paginationvii, 109 p.
      Number of Pages109
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL181545M
      LC Control Numbera 40003000
      OCLC/WorldCa3648301

      Yokuts, Southern, Plains and Northern Miwok, Nisenan and Pomo.4 I Vide A. H. Gayton, Areal Affiliations of California Folktales (American Anthropologist 4: , I); A. H. Gayton and Stanley S. Newman, Yokuts and Western Mono Myths . The Yokuts Indians were originally considered a distinct linguistic family but have now been made a part of the large Penutian stock.. Yokuts – The name for “person,” or “people,” in many of the dialects of the group. Also called: Mariposan, a name derived from Mariposa County, and applied to the stock to which these people were originally assigned by Powell.

        The Western Mono formerly probably numbered about 2,; in they had about half that number. Like other remotely located tribes in California, their population has suffered less from the inroads of civilization than that of the formerly far more numerous but accessible peoples, such as the Yokuts.   These quotes were from pages 89 and 90 of Mr. Latta's book, which means that "Miwok" stories and myths found in the book published by the Yosemite Association “The Legends of the Yosemite Miwok” are really Yokut stories and NOT Miwok. Also C. Hart Merriam, who wrote down those "Miwok" tales, conceded to Frank Latta in that he had been .

      This document was compiled during field trips made during the years , as well as from the field notes of Mrs. A. Rogers (in reference to the Chukchansi), and other published materials on the Yokuts and Western Mono. The material is well organized and precise in its presentation of Yokut and Western Mono ethnography. A major point of emphasis in this document is on . THE WESTERN MONO INDIANS. Origin. The Western Mono belong to the Uto-Aztecan language group that may once have occupied the Colorado Plateau. Several Uto-Aztecan subgroups diverged, with the Numic subgroup, ancestors of the Mono, Paiute, and other groups, occupying much of the Great Basin and South Eastern California. Between and A.D., .


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Yokuts and western Mono myths by A. H. Gayton Download PDF EPUB FB2

Download yokuts and western mono myths or read online books in PDF, EPUB, Tuebl, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get yokuts and western mono myths book now.

This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook that you want. Yokuts And Western Mono Myths. Genre/Form: Folklore: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Gayton, A.H.

(Anna Hadwick), Yokuts and western Mono myths. Berkeley. Genre/Form: Folklore Legends: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Gayton, A. (Anna Hadwick), Yokuts and western Mono myths.

Millwood, N.Y.: Kraus. Yokuts and Western Mono Myths, Volume 5 Anna Hadwick Gayton, Stanley Stewart Newman University of California Press, - Indians of North America - pages. Mono traditional narratives include myths, legends, tales, and oral histories preserved by the Mono people, including the Owens Valley Paiute east of the Sierra Nevada and the Monache on that range's western slope, in present-day eastern California.

An interesting contrast exists in Mono oral literature. The eastern group, the Owens Valley Paiute, have narratives that most Yokuts and western Mono myths book.

Yokut legend about the origin of Orion's belt. The Owl Doctor: How the owls brought Prairie Falcon back to life. Myths and Legends of California and the Old Southwest: Online book about Southwest and California Indian mythology.

Recommended Books of Yokuts Myths Yokuts and Western Mono Myths: Collection of Mono and Yokuts legends and. Yokuts and Western Mono Ethnography by A. Gayton; Yokuts and Western Mono Myths by A. Gayton, Stanley S. Newman (pp. ) Review by: Ruth Underhill DOI: / Mono Stories The Earthdiver: Mono myth about the creation of the world.

California Big Trees: Mono legend about owls and the redwood trees. Recommended Books on Mono Mythology Yokuts and Western Mono Myths: Collection of traditional Yokuts and Mono stories. Sponsored Links Additional Resources The Religion of the Indians of California. Yokuts traditional narratives include myths, legends, tales, and oral histories preserved by the Yokuts people of the San Joaquin Valley and southern Sierra Nevada foothills of central California.

Yokuts narratives constitute one of the most abundantly documented oral literatures in. Yokuts in and completed (in its basic essentials) Vokuts and Western Mono Myths (Anthropological 3, University of California, ).

BOOK REVIEWS others which transform it to a theme, which is then completed by another suffix. Adding a suffix to either a stem or theme results in another series of vowel changes.

Yokuts, also called Mariposan, North American Indians speaking a Penutian language and who historically inhabited the San Joaquin Valley and the western foothills of the Sierra Nevada south of the Fresno River in what is now California, U.S.

The Yokuts were traditionally divided into tribelets, perhaps as many as 50, each having a dialect, territory, and name of its own. Yokuts and Western Mono social organization are beyond the scope of this limited article, and as they are in need of a careful, extended reconsideration will not be touched upon here.

As Dr. Kroeber has set forth, the Yokuts (of Penutian linguistic stock) were grouped in more than forty named tribes or tribelets, each pos. Introduction The focus on this report is about the usage of native food plants by the Mono, also called Monanche or Western Mono, and the Yokuts Peoples of California.

I am focusing on these two Indigenous groups because I have grown. - Buy Yokuts and Western Mono Pottery Making book online at best prices in India on Read Yokuts and Western Mono Pottery Making book reviews & author details and more at Free delivery on qualified : A H Gayton.

Anna H. Gayton, author of Yokuts and Western Mono Myths., on LibraryThing LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers Home Groups Talk Zeitgeist. Yokuts and Western Mono Pottery Making Paperback – Octo by A. Gayton (Author) See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ $ Author: A. Gayton. (), and with Stanley S. Newman, Yokuts and Stanley S. Newman's Yokuts Language of Cali-Western Mono Myths (). Unpublished but fornia.2 The archaeology of Valley Yokuts accessible data on the use of jimsonweed by the territory, already investigated by Gifford, Yokuts and Western Mono are embodied in "The Schenck, Heizer, and others, has.

Other Western Mono groups located permanent villages on foothill lands along the North Fork of the Kaweah and in the lower Kings River watershed. [ 4 ] The Western Mono did not displace the Yokuts from their main homelands along the lower stretches of the Kaweah and Kings rivers and around Tulare Lake.

You searched for: Title Series "Human relations area files NS29 Yokuts" Remove constraint Title Series: "Human relations area files NS29 Yokuts" 1 - 14 of 14 Sort by Relevance.

Yokuts, Monache, and Tubatulabel all recognized condors by name [34], and Condor was a fairly prominent personality in several myths of the Yokuts and Monache (North Fork Mono) [35]. Shamans of all groups in this region were said to have worn ceremonial capes made of.

Mono, also called Monachi, either of two North American Indian groups, originally from what is now central California, U.S., who spoke a language belonging to the Numic group of the Uto-Aztecan family and were related to the Northern Western Mono, who resided in the pine belt of the Sierra Nevada mountains, had a culture similar to that of the nearby Yokuts.Coville, Frederick, V.

The Panament Indians of California. Amer. Anthr.,Culin, Stewart: Games of the North American Indians.Anna Hadwick Gayton, ‎Stanley Stewart Newman, Yokuts and western Mono myths, volume 5 (), page Males were known as iwap-naip (man- girl) and females as musp-iwap-naip (woman man-girl).

The former were more common.